Researchers link osteopenia to fecal incontinence

T-Score is a representation of how a patient’s bone mass density compares to an average 30 year old male. Patients are considered to have osteoporosis when their T-Score drops below -2.5 (25% less dense than average)

According to a 2013 study in the International Urogynecology Journal, women with osteopenia are at an increased risk of fecal incontinence. Researchers conducted a survey of 1,655 postmenopausal women who had undergone an osteoporosis evaluation. Of the respondents, 362 were diagnosed to have osteoporosis (T-score less than -2.5), 870 had osteopenia (T-score between -1 and -2.5), and a control of 423 women had a normal bone mass density.

The authors’ goal was to see which common pelvic floor conditions are associated with a loss in bone mass density. The survey found that “[o]verall prevalence of any urinary incontinence (UI) was 1,226/1,640 (75 %), with UI ≥2–3 times/week in 699/1,197 (58 %), fecal incontinence over the past month in 247/1,549 (16 %), and prolapse in 162/1,582 (10 %).”

A multivariate analysis showed that the women with osteopenia had increased risk of fecal incontinence compared to the other two groups. Women with osteoporosis were found to be at higher risk of urinary incontinence.

Bone density issues can complicate every part of a patient’s life, and pelvic health practitioners will benefit by understanding conditions like osteoporosis. The Meeks Method for Osteoporosiscourse offers clinicians a new set of tools to evaluate and treat osteoporotic patients. Join instructor Deb Gulbrandson, PT, DPT this September 22-23, 2018 in Detriot, or instructor Frank J Ciuba DPT, MS in Fairfield, CT on October 12-13, 2018 to expand your osteoporosis treatment skill set.

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